Books

11 May 2013

I was thinking about Nina and her letter drafts - nowadays, we all make drafts (of a kind), but our drafts are clean and ready to send; there aren't any inserted words or blacked-out words or crossed out paragraphs. Word processors take care of all such things efficiently and neatly. Once we print out our letter or click send, our letter or email is carefully stored in a virtual folder somewhere with thousands of other similar communications. Nina's few boxes of letters begin to pale in comparison.



Most of us are drowning in information, not only the information that forces itself upon us every day, from every possible angle, but even personal information that we happily receive and send (and usually store). Too much information? What do you think: will all this easily accessible information be a boon to future biographers, or will it simply be a source of frustration? As they say, too much of anything is never positive. If you have a spare moment, I would love to hear what you think.

4 comments:

  1. As a historian, I can say there can never be too much information, and if it's easy to access, then so much the better.

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  2. You are probably right, Tima; however, at times, I feel that we are actually drowning in information. I feel that we can process a certain amount, and then we simply 'turn off'.

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  3. I think mostly it is a good thing (information in abundance), though it does ask us to sift through many 'truths' before deciding on what is valid, real, and worth adding to our own archive of 'facts'. As such it probably doesn't make that much difference (even though the methods are vastly different), if our personal information is stored on servers or in boxes in an attic - as long as those searching are willing to look with both heart and mind. :)

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  4. Of course, you are both right. 'Sift' is possibly the operative word, and it is, therefore, important that we all become competent sifters...

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